QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR DOCTOR

Ask Your Doctor

It is very important to always keep an open line of communication with your doctor. Don’t be afraid to speak to your doctor about any medical issue that may be on your mind.

Make the most of your doctor’s visits by taking the opportunity to ask pertinent questions, your doctor is there to answer and allay your medical concerns.

Questions to ask your new doctor

When you visit a new doctor, you may want to ask a few questions to get to know your doctor and his/her expertise better. The first visit with a new doctor will be aimed at learning about you so that he or she can best treat you. However, make sure to use this opportunity to do the same.

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CAN YOU USE YOUR HEALTH INSURANCE IN EMERGENCIES?

HEALTH INSURANCE IN EMERGENCIES

Medical emergencies can happen at any time. Without insurance cover, you may find yourself in need of medical attention that will leave you out of pocket.

However, even if you do have medical insurance, certain insurers may not cover your emergency bills, depending on the contract you have with them.

So, what constitutes an emergency?

There are no actual ‘definitions or parameters’ to what constitutes a medical emergency, as this is usually determined on the spot by medical professionals such as the ambulance personnel or the medical doctor who responds to the event.

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What Is The Cost Of Medical Aid?

What Is The Cost Of Medical AidThe Grant Thornton Capital Medical Aid Survey for 2018, which compares local medical aid schemes on the cost to members across various levels of cover, was released to the public in July.

According to Business Tech, for the 2018 review, GTC screened 22 medical aids (21 open and 1 closed scheme – Profmed) offering 272 plans.

Medical aid prices are usually calculated depending on your salary, various your specific needs.

Health insurance and medical aid seem quite similar, but there are distinct differences which set them apart. These differences are also responsible for the disparity of the price points at which they are being offered to customers.

Even the cheapest medical aid is usually a bit pricier than a medical aid insurance premium.

What Is The Cost Of Medical Aid?

 

 

What Are Your Health Care Options Now That You’re Pregnant?

What Are Your Health Care Options Now That You_re Pregnant

Pregnancy is a beautiful time. The excitement that comes with knowing you are on your way to having a baby is second to none, but the financial burden it carries could put a strain on the ‘mother to be’.

Medical aid and medical insurance all have maternity benefits that vary with each plan, to assist the expectant mother with costs, both in hospital and specialist check-ups.

But what if I am not covered yet, but I am already pregnant?

No matter how far along you are in your pregnancy, unfortunately, it counts as a pre-existing condition if you are not yet covered by a medical insurance. The medical insurance is not obligated to cover anything related to your pregnancy, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t beneficial to still acquire the cover, even if you are already expecting.

What Are Your Health Care Options Now That You’re Pregnant?

Are You Just Really Tired Or Is It A Sign Of A Larger Issue

ARE YOU JUST REALLY TIREDWhile being tired 24/7 is a bitter part of adulthood, at what point does it indicate a more serious issue? There are many factors that affect your sleeping habits, but sometimes you’re more than fatigued.

You should be aiming to get in the around seven to nine hours of sleep a night to be fully rested. Most people struggle to make the minimum hours. Your pre-bedtime habits can affect how you sleep; these denominators could make the eight hours a night you sleep, feel like four. However, it’s not normal to feel persistently fatigued for more than a week, according to Jenepher Piper, M.S.N., a certified registered nurse practitioner tells SELF.

Eating before bed, exercising right before bed, your phone and mattress can all factor into the fatigue you feel the next day. On the other end of the scale, going to bed hungry and not exercising enough can also impact your sleep negatively.

There are many ways in which you could be sabotaging your sleep with, leaving you tired the next day.

In some cases you need to flag your fatigue to your doctor, but when? And what could your fatigue be a sign of?

“Sleepiness is simply the drive to sleep. Falling asleep during concerts, sales meetings, or intercourse are sure signs of excessive sleepiness,” board-certified sleep medicine doctor and neurologist W. Christopher Winter, M.D, of Charlottesville Neurology and Sleep Medicine, says.

And, of course, you could also feel wiped even though you know you got enough sleep. This is when you should consider you may just be more than tired.

Your excessive fatigue could be caused by something as minor as PMS, in female’s cases, or getting over a virus. Your immune system works hard to fend off an infection and can leave you feeling fatigued after being sick. Another cause of fatigue could be allergies. Feeling winded, coughing, and a runny nose are all common signs of allergies, but your immune system is kicked into high gear fighting off allergens and can leave you feeling worn out.

Clinical psychologist Alicia H. Clark, Psy.D, confirms your mental health can take a toll on your energy too. Feelings of hopelessness and helplessness associated with depression can drain you. Clarks added: “If you aren’t sleeping well then you may be more tired, and in turn have more trouble sleeping,”

“Insomnia and mental health challenges are closely related and can exacerbate each other.”

According to Clark “anxiety in particular can be draining” and leave you just as fatigued. If you suspect you’re suffering from these symptoms, you should reach out to your mental health care professional.

If you suffer from diarrhoea, gas, and vomiting once you ingest gluten, or if you don’t feel well after having wheat, barley, or rye products, you talk to your doctor about getting tested for celiac disease. Feeling weak or fatigued, even without other symptoms, could also be a sign of celiac disease, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Extreme fatigue could also indicate Chronic fatigue syndrome – a disorder that causes extreme and unexplained fatigue. It gets worse with physical activity but doesn’t get better once you rest. Another condition that would leave you feeling fatigued, is anemia. Other symptoms can include pale or yellowish skin, shortness of breath, and cold hands and feet. Anemia can be determined by your doctor and resolved by taking an iron supplement.

Fatigue can also be a sign of a Thyroid problem. Your thyroid helps impact several important functions of your body and an under-active thyroid, known as hypothyroidism, can slow down your bodily functions and leave you feeling tired.

Hyperthyroidism on the other hand, a thyroid condition when your thyroid is overactive, speeds everything up and can cause insomnia and an inner restlessness.

Aging can affect the quality of your sleep, as you get older you may wake up more often and have a less consistent sleep pattern. If your fatigue is coupled with other symptoms or disrupts your daily life, it’s best to speak to your GP.

Affinity Health offers a range of competitively priced health insurance products that are designed to protect you and your family against unforeseen medical expenses… Affinity Health also offers hospital cover for individuals and families in the event of a medical emergency or severe illness.

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Are eggs good or bad for your health?

Poached. Fried. Boiled. Deviled.

Eggs are a staple in most households, either as a quick meal or part of a larger, baked dish.

Filled with protein, eggs have also been used by body builders and gym enthusiasts, giving the impression that eggs are a superfood.

Then, for a while, cholesterol nuts argued that eggs were very, very bad for you.

Now, researchers are saying they are good again.

So what is the truth?

The Truth: Not only are eggs a fantastic source of lean protein and heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, but they contain some pretty important nutrients, says Jillian Michaels, a celebrity personal trainer and nutritionist.

She says; Whole eggs are a nearly perfect food, with almost every essential vitamin and mineral our bodies need to function. It is one of the few natural food sources of vitamin D and contains 7 grams of high-quality protein. Whole eggs are also full of omega-3 fatty acids and deliver many of the B vitamins and nutrients — B6, B12, riboflavin, folate, and choline — that, in fact, are believed to help prevent heart disease.

L-arginine, an amino acid found in eggs, is critical to the body’s production of protein and the release of growth hormones. Another amino acid found in eggs, leucine, also helps the body produce growth hormones as well as regulate blood sugar levels. The yolk itself contains most of these vitamins and minerals, plus half of its protein. When you eat only the egg whites, you’re missing out on all of these nutritional benefits and are getting only 3.5 grams, or half, of the protein.

So can you eat eggs every day?

Yes.

A single medium sized egg contains 186 mg of cholesterol. This is 62% of the recommended daily intake.

Eggs are among the most nutritious foods on the planet, but people are under the impression that if you eat cholesterol, that it would raise cholesterol in the blood.

Healthline.com says it isn’t that simple. The more you eat of cholesterol, the less your body produces instead.

Eggs had a bad reputation because yolks are high in cholesterol, but the truth is that cholesterol is a very important part of the body. It is a structural molecule that is an essential part of every single cell membrane.

Peter Schulman, MD, a cardiologist and professor of medicine at the University of Connecticut told Health.com, It’s true that eggs have a higher level of dietary cholesterol than many other foods—about 185 mg in one large egg. Not too long ago, eggs were even branded “as bad for you as smoking.”

“Now we know that what really raises your cholesterol is saturated fat in the diet and not so much the cholesterol in foods,” Dr. Schulman explains.

“When we eat cholesterol, it’s broken down in the gut; it’s not absorbed as a whole cholesterol molecule,” he says. Saturated fats, meanwhile, are broken into short chains of fatty acids that can become linked in the body—and that’s what has been shown to increase cholesterol levels significantly.

So, what does raise cholesterol?

Common culprits are:

Canola Oil and Other Processed Vegetable Oils.

Potato Chips and Other Packaged Foods.

Cookies and Other Sugary Treats

Milk and Other Conventional Dairy Products

Refined Grain Products

Grass-Fed Beef

Dark Chocolate

 

Suffering from high cholesterol is very serious, and can cause many heart problems, among other health issues.

A good hospital plan, and medical aid or medical insurance is essential in the event that you present with a dreadful condition.

And having great cover doesn’t have to break the bank. Research about which plan is right for you.

Affinity Health will offer you a hospital plan quote, as well as cheap medical cover.

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What is the difference between medical aid and medical insurance? – Learn with Affinity Health

What is the difference between medical aid and medical insurance

These days, medical aid seems to be a luxury that is only affordable to the rich. Since medical insurance entered the scene, the number one question asked by the public is, what is the difference between medical aid and medical insurance?

Well, this article is here to explain that as simply as possible.

When searching for an affordable medical aid, one plan might seem better than the other in some aspects, and then lack in the other. For example, one plan might cover doctors’ visits and every day procedures, but doesn’t cover hospital bills. Other plans may fully cover in hospital procedures, but then you have to pay out of pocket for essential meds and doctor visits. Continue reading “What is the difference between medical aid and medical insurance? – Learn with Affinity Health”